Liberia must learn to honor the rights of rural residents to manage their own land Liberia land rights

A palm oil plantation in Sinoe County, Liberia, is shown. Palm oil has been a flashpoint in Liberia, with the government giving international corporations license to establish industrial plantations and to handle the local communities as they see fit. (Dan Klotz / Burness)
A palm oil plantation in Sinoe County, Liberia, is shown. Palm oil has been a flashpoint in Liberia, with the government giving international corporations license to establish industrial plantations and to handle the local communities as they see fit. (Dan Klotz / Burness)

Liberia, the first African country to declare itself a republic and one of three African nations to take part in the establishment and adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, is on the brink of its own landmark achievement in human rights. Internal peace and security is within sight, an amazing vision after the recent Ebola epidemic devastated a country still scarred by decades of civil war.

But to get there, Liberia’s national legislature must overcome the bane of African politics everywhere — conflict caused by rapacious and uninhibited economic development and the ensuing human rights violations.

President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf won a Nobel Peace Prize in 2011, six years after her election, for guiding the country through the early stages of recovery. The country’s infrastructure had been demolished by two civil wars that killed hundreds of thousands of people between 1989 and 2003. READ MORE OF THIS REPORT

SOURCES: NewsNow/Los Angeles Times

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About Cholo Brooks 13810 Articles
Joel Cholo Brooks is a Liberian journalist who previously worked for several international news outlets including the BBC African Service. He is the CEO of the Global News Network which publishes two local weeklies, The Star and The GNN-Liberia Newspapers. He is a member of the Press Union Of Liberia (PUL) since 1986, and several other international organizations of journalists, and is currently contributing to the South Africa Broadcasting Corporation as Liberia Correspondent.