Qaida leader wanted by FBI killed: Kabul

Operation shows the militant group’s continued presence as US forces work to withdraw from America’s longest-running war amid continued bloodshed in Afghanistan

AP   |   Kabul   |


Meanwhile, the Afghan government continues to fight Taliban militants even as peace talks in Qatar between the two sides take place for the first time
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Afghanistan claimed on Sunday it killed a top al Qaida propagandist on an FBI most-wanted list during an operation in the country’s east, showing the militant group’s continued presence there as US forces work to withdraw from America’s longest-running war amid continued bloodshed there.

The reported death of Husam Abd al-Rauf, also known by the nom de guerre Abu Muhsin al-Masri, follows weeks of violence including an Islamic State-claimed suicide bombing on Saturday at an education centre near Kabul that killed 24 people.

Meanwhile, the Afghan government continues to fight Taliban militants even as peace talks in Qatar between the two sides take place for the first time.

The violence and al-Rauf’s reported killing threatens the face-to-face peace talks and risks plunging this nation beset by decades of war into further instability. It also complicates America’s efforts to withdraw, 19 years after it led an invasion targeting the Taliban for hosting al Qaida leader Osama bin Laden after the September 11 attacks.

Details over the raid that led to al-Rauf’s alleged death remained murky, hours after Afghanistan’s National Directorate of Security intelligence service claimed on Twitter to have killed him in Ghazni province. Al Qaida did not immediately acknowledge al-Rauf’s reported death. The FBI, the US military and Nato did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

The Afghan raid happened last week in Kunsaf, a village in Ghazni province’s Andar district some 150km southwest of Kabul, officials said.

Amanullah Kamrani, the deputy head of Ghazni’s provincial council, told The Associated Press that Afghan special forces led by the intelligence agency raided Kunsaf, which he described as being under Taliban control. On the village’s outskirts, they stormed an isolated home and killed seven suspected militants in a firefight, including al-Rauf, Kamrani said.

Neither Kamrani nor the intelligence agency offered details on how authorities identified al-Rauf, nor how they came to suspect he was in the village.

Wahidullah Jumazada, a spokesman for the provincial governor in Ghazni, said Afghan forces killed six suspected militants in the raid, without acknowledging that al-Rauf had been killed.

Kamrani alleged, without providing evidence, that the Taliban had been offering shelter and protection to al-Rauf. The Taliban said on Sunday they are investigating the incident, without elaborating.

If the Taliban had provided protection for al-Rauf, that would violate the terms of its February 29 deal with the US that jump-started the Afghan peace talks. That deal saw the Taliban agree “not to cooperate with groups or individuals threatening the security of the US and its allies”, which includes al Qaida.

Federal prosecutors in the southern district of New York filed a warrant for al-Rauf’s arrest in December 2018, accusing him of providing support to a foreign terrorist organisation and being part of a conspiracy to kill US citizens. The FBI put him on the bureau’s “Most Wanted Terrorists” list, which now includes 27 others.   The red-headed al-Rauf, believed to be born in 1958, is an Egyptian national.

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About Cholo Brooks 13507 Articles
Joel Cholo Brooks is a Liberian journalist who previously worked for several international news outlets including the BBC African Service. He is the CEO of the Global News Network which publishes two local weeklies, The Star and The GNN-Liberia Newspapers. He is a member of the Press Union Of Liberia (PUL) since 1986, and several other international organizations of journalists, and is currently contributing to the South Africa Broadcasting Corporation as Liberia Correspondent.

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