Will the legacy of Ebola help Liberia fight coronavirus?

The West African nation could learn from its hard-won fight against Ebola to fend off the new threat

By Will Brown | The Telegraph |

Ebola tore through the tattered health care systems of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea from 2014 and 2016, killing more than 11,000 people Credit: Getty

As coronavirus cases begin to soar in Africa, some have raised hopes that the west African nation of Liberia could learn from its hard-won fight against the Ebola virus to fend off the new threat. But while some lessons have been learned, a baffling decision from the government may hamstring Liberia’s response.

Ebola

During the 90s and early 2000s, Liberia and neighbouring Sierra Leone suffered some of the most devastating civil wars in recorded history.

Twelve years after the fighting stopped, Ebola struck. The disease tore through the tattered health care systems of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea killing more than 11,000 people from 2014 to 2016.  Liberia, with its tiny population of 4.5m, was hit hardest with close to 5,000 deaths.

Complete meltdown was only averted by an unprecedented international response costing billions of dollars and countless acts of heroism from local health workers, who faced almost certain death if they were infected.

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About Cholo Brooks 12218 Articles
Joel Cholo Brooks is a Liberian journalist who previously worked for several international news outlets including the BBC African Service. He is the CEO of the Global News Network which publishes two local weeklies, The Star and The GNN-Liberia Newspapers. He is a member of the Press Union Of Liberia (PUL) since 1986, and several other international organizations of journalists, and is currently contributing to the South Africa Broadcasting Corporation as Liberia Correspondent.