US Vice Presidential Candidates Debate Policy, Not Scandals

Republican vice-presidential nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic vice-presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine, right, walk past each other after the vice-presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016.
Republican vice-presidential nominee Gov. Mike Pence and Democratic vice-presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine, right, walk past each other after the vice-presidential debate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016.

WASHINGTON — When Republican Mike Pence and Democrat Tim Kaine sat across from each other Tuesday night, voters in the U.S. got their first actual debate about the policies Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton would pursue if elected the next country’s next president.

It was the first and only time the two vice presidential candidates will directly face off before the November 8 election, and the free-flowing format allowed them to push back against their opponent’s statements and press discussion on issues like criminal justice reform and what the U.S. should do in Syria.

“It stands in contrast to the first presidential debate, which was very personally oriented, very focused on scandals, very focused on guttural politics and not so much about what the future of America is going to look like,” said John Hudak, senior policy fellow at the Brookings Institution.

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SOURCE: VOA News Online

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About Cholo Brooks 13172 Articles
Joel Cholo Brooks is a Liberian journalist who previously worked for several international news outlets including the BBC African Service. He is the CEO of the Global News Network which publishes two local weeklies, The Star and The GNN-Liberia Newspapers. He is a member of the Press Union Of Liberia (PUL) since 1986, and several other international organizations of journalists, and is currently contributing to the South Africa Broadcasting Corporation as Liberia Correspondent.