GNN Begins Nationwide Opinion Poll For Liberia’s Pending Presidential election In 2017

As of the tenth of September, 2015 the GNN will bring to its many browsers worldwide a complete nationwide public opinion polls which will be conducted by its trained polling staff across Liberia.

This nationwide polls will features those candidates vying for the nation’s highest seat, the presidency, and the role of these political parties in the upcoming 2017 Liberia’s presidential and legislative elections.

We bring you outline below those political parties that are fighting to take state power in 2017

Unity Party (UP)

The Unity Party (UP) is a political party in Liberia that was started in 1984 by Edward B. Kesselly, also its first standard bearer. Officially founded at Buchanan in Grand Bassa County, the party was established on 27 July 1985.[1] The Unity Party participated in the first elections after the 1980 coup, running against then-President Samuel Doe in October 1985. The Party has remained active in Liberian politics since, and is now the ruling party in the Republic.

In the previous elections held on 19 July 1997, the UP presidential candidate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf won 9.58% of the vote. The party won 7 of 64 seats in the House of Representatives and 3 of 26 in the Senate. While international observers deemed the polls administratively free and transparent, they noted that it had taken place in an atmosphere of intimidation because most voters believed that former rebel leader and National Patriotic Party (NPP) candidate Charles Taylor would return to war if defeated.

Unity Party's candidate Ellen Johnson Sirleaf won the 2005 presidential elections, besting George Weah of the Congress for Democratic Change (CDC) in a run-off. The party also won 3 seats in the Senate and 8 in the House of Representatives. The merger of the Liberia Unification Party and the Liberian Action Party into the Unity Party on 1 April 2009 substantially increased its representation in the Legislature.

Congress for Democratic Change (CDC)

Congress for Democratic Change (CDC) is a Liberian political party formed by supporters of George Weah's 2005 presidential candidacy.

In the 11 October 2005 elections, Weah placed first in the presidential poll, winning 28.3% of the vote. He was defeated by Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of the Unity Party in the 8 November run-off election, winning 40.6% of the vote compared to Johnson-Sirleaf's 59.4%. The party won 3 seats in the Senate and 15 in the House of Representatives.

The Liberty Party (LP)

LP fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections, its candidate Charles Brumskine placed third in the presidential poll, winning 13.9% of the vote. The party won three seats in the Senate and nine in the House of Representatives.

In October 2010, the Liberty Party agreed to create a coalition with the Congress for Democratic Change (CDC), the largest party in the Legislature. The deal would have seen the two parties field a single list of candidates in the 2011 legislative elections and a single ticket for the 2011 presidential election made up of Brumskine and the CDC's standard-bearer, George Weah. However, this deal ultimately fell apart, and the Liberty Party announced in February 2011 that Senator Franklin Siakor had been chosen as Brumskine's running mate.

All Liberia Coalition Party

The All Liberia Coalition Party (ALCOP) is a political party in Liberia. In the last elections held on 19 July 1997, the ALCOP presidential candidate Alhaji G.V. Kromah won 4.02% of the vote. The party won 3 of 64 seats in the House of Representatives and 2 of 26 in the Senate. While international observers deemed the polls administratively free and transparent, they noted that it had taken place in an atmosphere of intimidation because most voters believed that former rebel leader and National Patriotic Party (NPP) candidate Charles Taylor would return to war if defeated.

Kromah ran again as the party's presidential candidate in the 11 October 2005 elections. He won 2.8% of the vote. The party won one seat in the Senate and two in the House of Representatives.

Alliance for Peace and Democracy (Liberia)

The Alliance for Peace and Democracy (APD) was a coalition of two Liberian political parties, the Liberian People's Party (LPP) and the United People's Party (UPP) that contested the 11 October 2005 elections.

APD candidate Togba-Nah Tipoteh won 2.3% of the vote in the presidential poll. The coalition won five seats in the Senate and three in the House of Representatives.

Both parties campaigned as part of the National Democratic Coalition in the 2011 presidential and legislative elections.

Alternative National Congress (ANC)

The ANC was established on 17 August 2013, after registering with the National Electoral Commission.The party won a single seat in the 2014 Senate elections, with Daniel Naatehn Sr winning in Gbarpolu County.

Liberian Destiny Party (LDP)

The Liberian Destiny Party (LDP) fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

LDP candidate Nathaniel Barnes won 1.0% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

National Democratic Party of Liberia (NDPL)

The NDPL was formed in August 1984 by supporters of Samuel Doe, who came to power in a 1980 military coup. The party contested the 15 October 1985 elections with Doe as its presidential candidate. He won 50.93% of the vote in an election marred by allegations of extensive irregularities and electoral fraud. The NDPL dominated both chambers of the Legislature, winning 21 of 26 seats in the Senate and 51 of 64 in the House of Representatives. The party's control of the country ended following the outbreak of the First Liberian Civil War in 1989 and the assassination of Doe in 1990.

The party later contested the 1997 general election. George Boley, a former minister in the Doe administration, was the party's presidential candidate. He won only 1.26% of the vote, while the party failed to win any House or Senate seats.

Following the end of the Second Liberian Civil War, the party contested the 2005 general election. The NDPL's presidential candidate, Winston Tubman, placed fourth and won 9.2% of the vote. In concurrent legislative elections, the party won two seats in the Senate and one in the House of Representatives.

National Patriotic Party (NPP)

The National Patriotic Party (NPP) is a political party in Liberia. It was formed in 1997 by members of the National Patriotic Front of Liberia following the end of the First Liberian Civil War.

The party contested the 1997 general election, with the NPFL's leader, Charles Taylor, serving as the party's presidential candidate. Taylor won the presidential election with 75% of the vote. The party also won 49 of 64 seats in the House of Representatives and 21 of 26 in the Senate. Due to domestic and international pressure as a result of the Second Liberian Civil War, Taylor stepped down as president in August 2003. In October of that year, Taylor's successor, Moses Blah, and the members of the Legislature resigned and ceded power to the National Transitional Government of Liberia.

The party later contested the 2005 general election. The party's presidential candidate was Roland Massaquoi, who earned 4.1% of the vote. The NPP also won four seats in the House of Representatives and another four in the Senate..

National Reformation Party (NRP)

The National Reformation Party (NRP) is a political party in Liberia. It participated in the 1997 elections and fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

In 1997, NRP presidential candidate Martin Sheriff won 0.48% of the vote while the party failed to win any representation in the bicameral Legislature.

In 2005, NRP candidate Alfred Reeves won 0.3% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party won one seat in the Senate and one in the House of Representatives.

New Deal Movement (NDM)

The New Deal Movement (NDM) is a political party in Liberia. In the 2005 general election, the presidential candidate of the party, George Klay Kieh, Jr. and his running mate Alaric Tokpa won 0.5% of the votes, while the Party received 3.62% of the vote, good for three seats in the House of Representatives of Liberia.

People's Unification Party (PUP)

The PUP was established in 2014, with its founders including House of Representatives member James Emmanuel Nuquay and Senator Henry Yallah, and was joined by Senator Sumo Kupee after he was defeated in the Unity Party primaries. It won a single seat in the December 2014 Senate elections, with Jim Tornonlah elected in Margibi County.

True Whig Party (TWP)

The True Whig Party, also known as Liberian Whig Party, is the oldest political party in Liberia. Founded in 1869, the party dominated Liberian politics from 1878 until 1980 to the extent that the country was virtually a one-party state, although opposition parties were never outlawed.Initially, its ideology was heavily influenced by that of the United States Whig Party.

The political party was founded in the township of Clay-Ashland in 1869. It presided over a society where Black American settlers and their descendants were almost 100% of the citizens able to vote, and so represented them, often working in tandem with the Masonic Order.[citation needed] The party endorsed systems of forced labour. In 1930 they sold slaves to Spanish colonialists on Fernando Po (now Bioko in Equatorial Guinea),[citation needed] leading to a five-year U.S. and British boycott of Liberia. Despite this dispute, the West saw them as a stabilizing, unthreatening force and so invested heavily in the nation under William Tubman's leadership (1944–1971).

The party lost power after Tubman's successor, William Tolbert, was killed in an April 1980 military coup by soldiers opposed to his clampdown on the political opposition and his tolerance of corruption. It was then the opposition's turn to clamp down on the True Whig Party; the vast majority of its members and supporters left the party, but it struggled on as a minor party.

In 1991, the party faced a challenge from a new group calling itself the "National True Whig Party of Liberia," and TWP chairman Momo Fahnbulleh Jones threatened legal action to induce the newly founded party to change its name.

The party participated in the 2005 general election as part of the Coalition for the Transformation of Liberia, which dissolved the next year. It registered to compete as an individual party in the 2011 general election, while endorsing President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf's bid for a second term.However, the party experienced strife over leadership five months before the election, and it failed to nominate any candidate for any legislative seat.

Freedom Alliance Party of Liberia (FAPL)

The Freedom Alliance Party of Liberia (FAPL) fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

FAPL candidate Margaret Tor-Thompson won 0.9% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

In the Liberian elections of 2011 the party nominated Togba-Nah Tipoteh for president.

Free Democratic Party (FDP)

The Free Democratic Party (FDP) is a political party in Liberia. It participated in the 1997 elections and fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

In 1997, FDP presidential candidate Fayah Gbollie won 0.32% of the vote while the party failed to win any representation in the bicameral legislature.

In 2005, FDP candidate David Farhat won 0.5% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

Labor Party of Liberia (LPL)

The Labor Party of Liberia (LPL) is a political party in Liberia. It fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

LPL candidate Joseph Woah-Tee won 0.6% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

Liberia Equal Rights Party (LERP)

The Liberia Equal Rights Party (LERP)  fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

LERP candidate Joseph Korto won 3.3% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

The party was disqualified from contesting the 2011 presidential and legislative elections.

National Vision Party of Liberia (NATVIPO)

The National Vision Party of Liberia (NATVIPO fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

NATVIPOL candidate George Kiadii won 0.4% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

Progressive Democratic Party (PRODEM)

The Progressive Democratic Party (PRODEM) is a political party in Liberia, formed in 2005. It fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

The party's presidential candidate, Sekou Conneh, was chairman of the rebel group Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy (LURD) during Liberia's second civil war. Conneh won 0.6% of the vote in the presidential poll.

The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

Reformed United Liberia Party (RULP)

The Reformed United Liberia Party (RULP) fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

RULP candidate William V.S. Tubman, Jr. won 1.6% of the vote in the presidential poll. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

The party was disqualified from contesting the 2011 presidential and legislative elections.

Union of Liberian Democrats (ULD)

The Union of Liberian Democrats (ULD) also fielded candidates in the 11 October 2005 elections.

Robert Kpoto, presidential candidate of the ULD, won 0.4% of the vote. The party failed to win any seats in the Senate or House of Representatives.

Others include, Movement for Progressive Change (MPC), All Liberian Party, Liberia People's Democratic Party (LPDP), Liberia National Union (LINU), and others that are yet to register are said to be in the making

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